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Pavilions Tulsa | Pavilions and Spring Weather

PMH Tulsa designs, builds and installs custom western red cedar Pavilions Tulsa for outdoor living spaces. They are stained and used for both decorative and functional purposes. One of the main uses of a Tulsa pavilion is for shelter from the rain. Spring, also known as the Vernal Equinox, starts around March 21 or sometime between March 20-22, when the sun passes right over the equator. Almost equal amounts of sunshine occur over all areas of the state of Oklahoma. Those who live north of the Equator are getting ready for warmer weather, while those who live to the south of the equator are looking for their winter jackets. The sun’s more direct warming rays are crossing over from the southern hemisphere to the north. These rays of sunshine will help get the grass growing again or will at least accelerate the growth and the plants blooming power. In Oklahoma, it is our wet season, but also spans much of the severe weather season. PMH Tulsa designs, builds and installs custom western red cedar Pavilions Tulsa for outdoor living spaces. They are stained and used for both decorative and functional purposes. One of the main uses of a Tulsa pavilion is for shelter from the rain. Summer Solstice happens around June 21 or sometime between June 20-22 and is the first of two equinoxes that happen at or the beginning of summer. You might know this as the day with most amount of sunshine in our state, but also the start of what is usually some very, very hot weather over Oklahoma and western north Texas. On this day, of Summer Solstice, the sun reaches its furthest northern point in the sky, and slowly begins to set further and further south. But the rays of sunshine are hitting us in full force, which usually leads to temperatures in the nineties to over one hundred degrees at various times throughout the summer solstice. PMH Tulsa designs, builds and installs custom western red cedar Pavilions Tulsa for outdoor living spaces. They are stained and used for both decorative and functional purposes. One of the main uses of a Tulsa pavilion is for shelter from the rain. Fall, also known as the Autumnal Equinox, happens around September 21, or between September 20-23, and marks the second equinox of the entire year. The sun is crossing the equator, and it is going from the northern Hemisphere into the southern Hemisphere. All areas of the Earth will receive approximately the same amount of the sun’s rays. Normally a welcome time of the year, as summers over Oklahoma and western north Texas are usually quite hot and miserable with high amounts of humidity. The northern hemisphere begins to tilt away from the sun’s direct energy, which finally should begin to cool us off. The north pole, where Santa Claus lives, will point further and further away from the sun, which means shorter daylight hours, and in some cases the daylight hours diminish faster and faster. PMH Tulsa designs, builds and installs custom western red cedar Pavilions Tulsa for outdoor living spaces. They are stained and used for both decorative and functional purposes. One of the main uses of a Tulsa pavilion is for shelter from the rain. Winter Solstice happens around December 21 or between December 20-22, when we experience our second solstice of the entire year. Even with the proximity of the Earth to the Sun being at its closest point, the northern hemisphere is facing far away from the sun, which means a longer period of colder weather. The first day of winter also has the least amount of daylight hours. However, the number of daylight hours slowly increases as we get closer to Spring. PMH Tulsa designs, builds and installs custom western red cedar Pavilions Tulsa for outdoor living spaces. They are stained and used for both decorative and functional purposes. One of the main uses of a Tulsa pavilion is for shelter from the rain. Oklahoma’s average annual temperature varies between fifty-eight degrees fare height and sixty-two degrees fare height according to the Oklahoma Climatological Survey team, but these averages hide large variations. Summer months are very hot, particularly in the southwest where a temperature of one hundred- and twenty-degrees fare height was recorded in Tipton in 1994. The southwest can expect one hundred and fifteen days with a temperature above one hundred degrees fare height each year. In winter, temperatures plummet and if you are in the southeast in winter, expect to experience around sixty days of thirty-two degrees fare height or even below in certain spots. The changes in rainfall between the eastern and western parts of the state is one of the climate’s main features, according to the Oklahoma Climatological Survey. The annual average precipitation varies from fifty-six inches in the extreme southeast to seventeen inches in the western panhandle. Winter snowfall patterns, however, are almost a mirror image, with thirty inches falling in the panhandle on an average year compared with less than two inches in the east of the state. If you are visiting in the winter, watch out for freezing rain, which turns roads treacherous and can cause power outages by pulling down power lines. Oklahoma is no stranger to climatic extremes of flood and drought throughout certain times of the year. Flooding usually occurs in the spring and summer months when rainfall is at its peak and intense thunderstorms send huge amounts of water into the river systems. The state is largely reliant on rainfall for its usable water, meaning that drought can occur relatively quickly, particularly in the west where the precipitation is low. The most famous period of drought is probably that of the 1930s, when low rainfall and overgrazing turned much of western Oklahoma and neighboring states into the famous “Dust Bowl” that everyone has heard or read about on the news and in books. One of the most distinctive features of Oklahoma’s climate is the tendency for tornadoes to appear out of nowhere. In fact, the state boasts one of the highest incidences of tornadoes per unit area in the entire world, according to the Oklahoma Historical Society. Spring is the peak tornado time, when warm moist air from the Gulf of Mexico meets cold air moving southwards from polar regions. More than one hundred people died as a result of tornadoes in incidents in 1905 and 1947, while in May 1999 the winds of three hundred and twenty miles per hour were recorded in a tornado that crashed through Oklahoma City. PMH Tulsa designs, builds and installs custom western red cedar Pavilions Tulsa for outdoor living spaces. They are stained and used for both decorative and functional purposes. One of the main uses of a Tulsa pavilion is for shelter from the rain.

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